Data about Winter

Overall Success Retention and Success Rates from 1992-2012

Fall

Spring

Summer

           Winter

Retention

Success

Retention

Success

Retention

Success

Retention

Success

Years without Winter

80%

66%

80%

66%

87%

76%

Years with Winter

85%

68%

84%

68%

90%

79%

90%

78%

As an estimate, given a constant student population from 1992 through 2012, the results above reveal that 1,825 more students would have succeeded in fall, 1,525 more in spring, and 734 more in winter, if the Board of Trustees would not have eliminated the winter intersession. The Board did not consider nor present data when they decided to cancel Winter.

Basic Skills Retention and Success Rates from 1992-2012*

61.72% average basic skills success rate from 1993-2003, (years with trimester model – no winter)

66.75% average basic skills success rate 2004-2012 (years with winter)

82.5% average Basic Skills retention rate from 1993-2003 (years with trimester model)

88.45% average Basic Skills retention rate from 2004-2012 (years with winter)

Enrollment count for Winter 2004-2012*

Winter 2004 Winter 2005 Winter 2006 Winter 2007 Winter 2008 Winter 2009 Winter 2010 Winter 2011 Winter 2012
Credit Sections Count Credit Sections FTES Enrollment Count Credit Sections Count Credit Sections FTES Enrollment Count Credit Sections Count Credit Sections FTES Enrollment Count Credit Sections Count Credit Sections FTES Enrollment Count Credit Sections Count Credit Sections FTES Enrollment Count Credit Sections Count Credit Sections FTES Enrollment Count Credit Sections Count Credit Sections FTES Enrollment Count Credit Sections Count Credit Sections FTES Enrollment Count Credit Sections Count Credit Sections FTES Enrollment Count
476 1,511.35 12,401 555 1,623.37 13,785 586 1,792.19 14,972 637 1,960.62 16,351 627 2,056.28 16,425 661 2,196.84 18,199 341 1,275.88 10,355 389 1,422.87 11,232 271 996.17 7,954

*data taken from California Chancellor’s Office website

Did you know?

  • The Fall-Winter-Spring-Summer calendar had been in effect from 2004 until 2011 (8 years) before the PCC Board of Trustees decided to phase out winter in 2011 and kill it completely in 2012.
  • Hundreds of sections (389-661 sections) were offered, serving 10,355-18,199 students in any given winter, generating anywhere from 1275 FTES to 2196 FTES in any given winter.
  • Even in Winter 2011 with only 389 sections scheduled by the administration, there were 1,422 FTES and 11,232 students served.
  • In Winter 2012, only 271 sections were created, which brought down the FTES to 996 and served only 7954 students
  • The reason given at the time of canceling Winter in 2012 was financial: Vice President Bob Bell and President Rocha told the Board and the public that PCC could not offer winter intersession because of financial duress. This was not the case. Shortly after that, President Rocha signed a document to the Chancellor’s Office signing off that PCC was not under any financial hardship – indeed, the school had $110 million in reserves.
  • In July 2013,  when the Board was deciding whether to roll over the calendar without winter or vote for the 2013-2014 calendar with winter that both the shared governance Calendar Committee and Academic Senate voted for, President Rocha presented to the Board data for the first time: “persistence data.”

Money saved or not saved for Winter cancellation

Still TBD – never answered nor requested by Board of Trustees.

(At the September 4, 2013 Board of Trustees, Vice President Miller presented the budget expenditures comparing last year and this year. He did not show nor when asked did he explain how much $ has been saved in teaching over-load as a result of the Winter cancellation. )

 

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